Advice and Consent

With the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg the U.S. Supreme Court is down a member. It is the President’s job to nominate a replacement Justice for the Supreme Court. And per the Constitution it is the Senate’s job to confirm or deny such appointments.

Throughout President Trump’s presidency the Senate has dragged its heels in the confirmations of his Administration. No other president in history has had such a delay in getting their nominees appointed or even getting Senate hearings for them. So the Senate certainly isn’t Pro-Trump otherwise this would not be the case.

During the previous administration, there was an opening on the Supreme Court and President Obama did his duty in nominating a replacement Justice. And the Senate did their duty as well.

They rightly refused to have a hearing for the confirmation of Merrick Garland who was nominated by President Obama. The Constitution clearly states that the President needs the Advice and Consent of the Senate to appoint Judges to the Supreme Court. The Senate did not give their Advice or Consent in President Obama’s nomination of Mr. Garland. Yet he didn’t have any issues getting his administration confirmed.

The Senate is under no obligation to give consent to any appointment. That is why there are many still open positions within the Administration of President Trump. The Senate hasn’t given their consent to his appointments. He will either have to withdraw the nominees and appoint someone else or wait to see if it gets filled.

So here we are coming up on a presidential election in November. And President Trump is still the President of the United States until at least January 20th of 2021. And I pray that he is President for the next four years as well.

No matter the outcome of the coming election. If President Trump submits a nomination to the Senate. The Senate has every right to either hold hearings and confirm the nomination or reject it.

The President or someone else?

There seems to be a lot of confusion when it comes to the job qualifications and description of the President of the United States. So let’s get this cleared up.

Our nation’s founders were brilliant men. And they wrote out the qualifications needed to be President and what the job description was. So we don’t need to guess or make it up as we go.

All of the details can be found in the Constitution. Anything else added or taken away is your own personal preferences. So your opinion is logged and noted. But irrelevant when it comes to the facts.

Article II, Section 1 is where it lists the qualifications to become President of the United States. You must win the election through the Electors, that is the Electoral College and take the oath of office.

But before you can win the election and take the oath of office you must also have these qualifications: One must be a Natural born citizen of the United States, be at least 35 years of age, and lived within the United States for at least 14 years immediately prior to being elected.

That is it for qualifications to be President. No lengthy resume of public service. No skill in oratory. No tests of morality or divulging ones tax history.

As for the job description and duties of the President, again the Constitution clearly tells us that too. The President is the Commander in Chief of the armed forces. The President proposes bills to Congress, this is so his agenda can move forward. And since the President is the executive power, it is his job to enforce the laws.

Another part of the President’s job is to give a state of the union report from time to time to Congress.

Many of the duties of the President require the US Senate to consent. This is used for the enactment of any Treaty and the appointment of officers of the United States government.

That is it. That is the end of the job qualifications and the job description for the President of the United States. Anything else is opinion or tradition. These are the facts written in the Constitution.